Vickers Wellington L4348

Meall Ceann Loch Strathy, Highland

 
     
 
lefttop
 

 

 

Advertisements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Type Photo

 

BELOW: An RAF Vickers Wellington bomber.

 

An RAF Vickers Wellington bomber in flight

 

Photo: Source unknown

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Type and Background

 

RAF Vickers Wellington Mk I / L4348

 


 

(Click here for RAF history of this type)

 

Aircraft Type Nickname: Wimpy (or Wimpey).

 

 

The Wellington was a medium bomber, of which there were 16 variants, the first Wellington bombers were powered by two 1,050 hp Bristol Pegasus Mk. I radial engines. It had a maximum speed of 235 mph (410 km/h)

 

Like the Vickers Wellesley, the Wellington was constructed using a geodetic (lattice) framework to provide additional strength and durability for the fuselage. As a result of this design by Barnes Wallis, Wellington bombers were able to survive and return safely to base even after sustaining considerable damage.

 

The first Wellingtons entered service with No. 99 Squadron RAF. Later, an improved version entered service with RAF Bomber Command. The aircraft carried a crew of six.

 


 

BELOW: A Vickers Wellington Mk 1A (N2980) on display at Brooklands Museum, Weybridge, Surrey, UK.

 

Note the geodetic structure which strengthened this aircraft very considerably, and enabled it to continue flying after sustaining heavy damage.

 

Vickers Wellington Mk 1A (N2980) on display at Brooklands Museum, Weybridge, Surrey

 

Photo: 2006 Tony Tipton

 

(CC-BY-2.5. Released by the author under GNU Free Documentation License.)

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Accident Details

 

Assigned to 20 Operational Training Unit (OTU), this Wellington was on a navigational exercise (NAVEX) out of RAF Lossiemouth. On the homeward bound trip the crew called at 15.14 hrs with no reported problem.

The aircraft was then seen by another 20 OTU Wellington in flames on the ground at 16.42 hrs. The time of the accident is recorded as 16.00 hrs.

According to unconfirmed reports, the aircraft wings iced up while flying through cloud. Consequently, the pilot was unable to maintain lift. Shortly afterward, he lost control of the aircraft, and this culminated in a near vertical dive into the ground.

The impact created a deep crater in the ground (now filled with water) that eerily resembles the front profile of the aircraft. The two engines also bear witness to the impact as they have both been smashed to pieces.


 

 

 

Aircraft Crew Casualties

 

All on board perished in this accident. These were:

  • Pilot: Fl/Sgt. Harold Sidney Douglas Goss 742058 R.A.F.V.R. Age 22.

  • Obs: Sgt. Anthony Richard McCoy 1166019 R.A.F.V.R. Age ?

  • Obs: Sgt. Alfred Flint 1163046 R.A.F.V.R. Age 28.

  • W/Op/Air/Gnr: Sgt. Malcolm Edward Kent 404470 R.A.A.F. Age 23.

  • W/Op/Air/Gnr: Sgt. Allan James Wilson 404111 R.N.Z.A.F. Age 20.

 

Burial details:


Fl/Sgt. Harold Sidney Douglas Goss.

 Watford Cemetery. Sec. K. Uncons. Row 2. Grave 801.
Son of Sidney James Goss and Gladys Lilian Goss, of Watford; husband of Denise Doreen Goss.


Sgt. Anthony Richard McCoy.

 Wick Cemetery. Sec O. Grave 417. No further details as yet.


Sgt. Alfred Flint.

 Braunstone Church. Leicestershire.
Son of Harry and Lilla Evelyn Flint, of Bushby.


Sgt. Malcolm Edward Kent.

 Wick Cemetery. Sec O. Grave 436
Son of Edward George and Ann Kent, of Gregg street, Roma, Queensland, Australia.
Miss Z.E. Hammett 22 Staple Street West End Townsville Queensland.


Sgt. Allan James Wilson.

 Wick Cemetery. Sec O. Grave 439
Son of Herbert and Jean Geraldine Wilson, of Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand.

 

 

(Please click on the hyperlinked names above for further details at the Commonwealth War Commission's website.)

 


[Researched by: Kelvin T. Youngs
Aircrew Remembrance Society for relatives / friends of the crew.]

 

 

 

 

 

Crash Site Photos

 

BELOW: Meall Ceann moor, near Loch Strathy.

 

Vickers Wellington L4348 crashed at this location on 5 December 1941. This area is now known locally as 'Bomber Flat' (D. Gordon)

 

Meall Ceann moor, near Loch Strathy. This is the site of the Wellington crash 

 

Photo: © 2008 Gary Nelson 

 



 

BELOW: Wreckage from the Wellington aircraft lies scattered around this water-filled crater.

 

wreckage around water-filled crater near loch strathy

 

Photo: © 2013 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Spars and other fragmented wreckage from the Wellington.

 

spars and other fragmented wreckage from the wellington

 

Photo: © 2013 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: A fractured crankshaft from one of the two engines.

 

fractured crankshaft from one of the engines

 

Photo: © 2013 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Part of a cylinder head from an engine.

 

a cylinder head from an engine

 

Photo: © 2013 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: significant amounts of wreckage pieces still lie under the water.

 

significant wreckage pieces still lie under the water

 

Photo: © 2013 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Part of a spar and other wreckage.

 

a spar and other wreckage parts 

 

Photo: © 2013 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: More parts of the Wellington's airframe.

 

more parts of the wellington's airframe

 

Photo: © 2013 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: More wreckage from the shattered airframe.

 

more assorted wreckage

 

Photo: © 2013 Neil Daniel

 

 

MORE PHOTOS BELOW

 

 


 

 

 

 

 


 

BELOW: The impact crater showing the front profile of the aircraft. The Wellington dived almost vertically into the ground, thus much of the wreckage is concentrated around this point.

 

water-filled impact crater showing the front profile of the aircraft  

 

Photo: © 2008 Gary Nelson 

 


 

BELOW: A broken crankshaft from one of the engines, with a cylinder head lying just behind it.

 

a broken crankshaft from one of the four engines  

 

Photo: © 2008 Gary Nelson 

 


 

BELOW: Fragmented remains from the Wellington lie scattered around the impact crater.

 

fragmented remains from the Wellington bomber lie scattered around the impact crater  

 

Photo: © 2008 Gary Nelson 

 


 

BELOW: A shattered cylinder block from one of the two engines.

 

a shattered cylinder block from one of the engines 

 

Photo: © 2008 Gary Nelson 

 



 

BELOW: A stainless steel buckle, possibly forming part of a harness strap from the pilot's seat or similar.

 

(This buckle was found at the crash site by a farmer who  had been working this land on Rhifail Estate until his retirement.)

 

stainless steel buckle from cockpit area

 

Photo: © 2012 Michael Spencer

 



 

BELOW: Fragments of engine cylinders.

 

fragments of engine cylinders 

 

Photo: © 2008 Gary Nelson 

 


 

BELOW: More fragmented wreckage at the opposite end of the crater.

 

more fragmented wreckage at the opposite end of the crater  

 

Photo: © 2008 Gary Nelson 

 


 

BELOW: Section of spar close to main wreckage.

 

Section of spar close to main wreckage. 

 

Photo: © 2008 Gary Nelson 

 


 

BELOW: (nearest to camera): Possibly, part of a hydraulic landing gear assembly.

 

Possibly, part of hydraulic landing gear 

 

Photo: © 2008 Gary Nelson 

 

 


 

 

Photo Gallery

 

For additional crash site and wreckage photos please select

 WELLINGTON-MEALL-CEANN

from the drop down Album Menu in the Photo Gallery.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOP OF PAGE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crash Date / Site

 

 

Accident Date: 5 Dec 1941

 

Accident Site:

Meall Ceann (344m)

(Loch Strathy)

 

(Wreckage on Meall Ceann moor - open moorland near Loch Strathy. See Crash Site photos below.)

 

Region: Highland (Sutherland) (Strathnaver / Strath Halladale)

 

Nearest town or village:

Strathy (A836), Skelpick (B871) or Rough Haugh (B871)

 

Nearest large towns:

Bettyhill (NW) or Tongue (W)

 

OS Grid Ref. 10 / 759457

 

GPS Ref: N/A

 

Present Condition: Fragmented remains including both engines, which disintegrated during impact, still remain at the crash site. The wreckage area is fairly localised, although initially may prove hard to find. remaining wreckage. The last remaining pieces were found and removed a few years ago.

 

 

 

Aircraft Details

 

 

Registration or Serial: L4348

 

Operator: RAF (20 Operational Training Unit (OTU); (later transferred to No. 91 Group))

 

Operating Station: RAF Lossiemouth; (RAF No. 91 Group Bomber OTU. Operating base also for No. 46 Maintenance Unit (MU), and RN HMS Fulmar.)

 

Station Location: Lossiemouth, Morayshire, 5 miles N of Elgin.

 

Current Station Status: Operational Military Airport.

 

Current Station Name: RAF Lossiemouth (EGQS)

 

 

 

 

Hill Walking Links

 

(Hillwalking and Mountaineering)

WalkingScotland (The official Walking site of Scotland's national tourism organisation)

Walking Scotland's Mountains

 

 

Other Outdoor Activities

 

Backpacking and Backpackers

Backpacking in Britain

Backpacking Lite

Cicerone (Backpacking Guides for Walking in the UK)

The Backpackers Club

UK Backpacking Websites

 

 

Kayaking and Canoeing

Kayak Scotland (Sea Kayaking in Scotland)

Kayaking at Active Scotland (Various venues)

Sea Kayak Scotland

 

Mountain Biking

 

 

Rock Climbing and Abseiling

Abseiling in Perthshire

Abseiling Scotland (Various venues)

Climbing, Scrambling and Abseiling Scotland

Mountain Sports Courses and Paddle Sports Courses at Glenmore Lodge

Rock Climbing at Scottish National Outdoor Training Centre (Skills Courses and Qualifications Courses)

Rock Climbing in Scotland (Rock Climbing Areas)

UKClimbing.com (UKC) (Includes Abseiling / Rappelling)

 

Trekking and Hiking

Gairloch Trekking Centre (Pony Trekking in the Scottish Highlands)

Pony and Quad Treks (North Wales)

Ramblers (UK)

Ramblers (Worldwide Holidays)

Trekking Britain

Walking and Hiking

 


 

Emergency Services Link

Register for Text 999 Emergency Service

If you cannot make voice calls, you can now contact the 999 emergency services by SMS text from your mobile phone.

 

 

 

 
righttop