Vickers Wellington N2883

Glenmoriston, Highland

 
     
 
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Aircraft Type Photo

 

BELOW: An RAF Vickers Wellington bomber.

 

An RAF Vickers Wellington bomber in flight

 

Photo: Source unknown

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Type and Background

 

RAF Vickers Wellington  / N2883

 


 

(Click here for RAF history of this type)

 

Aircraft Type Nickname: Wimpy (or Wimpey).

 

 

The Wellington was a medium bomber, of which there were 16 variants, the first Wellington bombers were powered by two 1,050 hp Bristol Pegasus Mk. I radial engines. It had a maximum speed of 235 mph (410 km/h)

 

Like the Vickers Wellesley, the Wellington was constructed using a geodetic (lattice) framework to provide additional strength and durability for the fuselage. As a result of this design by Barnes Wallis, Wellington bombers were able to survive and return safely to base even after sustaining considerable damage.

 

The first Wellingtons entered service with No. 99 Squadron RAF. Later, an improved version entered service with RAF Bomber Command. The aircraft carried a crew of six.

 


 

BELOW: A Vickers Wellington Mk IV. This aircraft had just returned from a raid on Bremen. The geodetic structure which strengthened this aircraft enabled it to return safely to base after sustaining heavy damage.

 

wellington mark iv after its return from bremen. fuselage severely damaged but returned safely due in part to geodetic construction 

 

Photo: Original source unknown 

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Accident Details

 

The pilot was killed along with five others in the crash of Wellington N2883 of 20 Operational Training Unit on 19 September 1940. The aircraft flew into high ground at Glenmoriston, near Fort Augustus, Inverness, whilst on a bombing and navigation exercise from RAF Lossiemouth. The deaths were registered in the District of Glenmoriston, Inverness on September 24th [1940]. (Extract from entry on FELIXSTOWE WAR MEMORIAL).

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Crew Casualties

 

All crew members died in this accident. They were:

 

 

All crew members were buried at Lossiemouth Burial Ground, Moray. (See photos below.)

 

(Please click on the hyperlinked names above for futher details at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's website.)

 

 

 

 

 

Memorial Photos    (Lossiemouth Burial Ground)

 

BELOW: Alexander Lindsey Cameron (23).

 

Alexander Lindsey Cameron (23).

 

Photo: © 2015 Steven Spink

 


 

BELOW: Alfred Clarence Dandridge (25).

 

Alfred Clarence Dandridge (25).

 

Photo: © 2015 Steven Spink

 


 

BELOW: Gordon Hughes Gratton.

 

Gordon Hughes Gratton.

 

Photo: © 2015 Steven Spink

 


 

BELOW: Peter Guy Vargas Jarvis (19).

 

Peter Guy Vargas Jarvis (19).

 

Photo: © 2015 Steven Spink

 


 

BELOW: David Langley Parker (20).

 

David Langley Parker (20).

 

Photo: © 2015 Steven Spink

 


 

BELOW: Harry Reed Stothard (23).

 

Harry Reed Stothard (23).

 

Photo: © 2015 Steven Spink

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crash Site Photos

 

 

Approach Route Photos

 

 

BELOW (next two photos): Yet another abandoned tractor.

 

(next two photos): Yet another abandoned tractor.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Ample parking at Balnacarn.

 

Ample parking at Balnacarn.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: There are two obvious routes from here: Follow the road seen going up the hill on the right which was constructed when they installed a pipeline and is not shown on the O/S maps, or follow a path marked on the O/S maps which runs up the left hand side of this plantation. Despite having to scale 3 deer fences the pipeline route was easier.

 

There are two obvious routes from here:

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: View west from the pipeline road just before it enters the plantation.

 

View west from the pipeline road just before it enters the plantation.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: First obstacle, a 7ft high deer fence and the gate is locked.

 

First obstacle, a 7ft high deer fence and the gate is locked.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: View south across Glen Moriston.

 

View south across Glen Morriston.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The end of the road and the 2nd obstacle, a 0.8km (1/2 mile) of swamp. However a quad track meant it was much easier going than it looked.

 

The end of the road and the 2nd obstacle, 1/2 a mile of swamp.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The area where the wrecksite is supposed to be. It is actually on the other side of the small hill on the right just above the tree line.

 

The area where the wrecksite is supposed to be. It is actually on the other side of the small hill on the right just above the tree line.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 

 


 

 

Assorted Wreckage

 

 

BELOW (next two photos): Pieces of Wellington N2883.

 

(next two photos): Pieces of Wellington N2883.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW (next nine photos): There are lots of small fragments hidden in the heather.

 

(next nine photos): There are lots of small fragments hidden in the heather.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 

 

 

 

MORE PHOTOS BELOW

 

 

 


 

 

 

 


 

 

BELOW (next two photos): The largest piece remaining. This is a piece of wing spar from where the two spars joined together.

 

(next two photos): The largest piece remaining. This is a piece of wing spar from where the two spars joined together.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW (next two photos): These are photos of similar parts at the wrecksite of Wellington L7845 on Muckle Cairn.

 

(next two photos): These are photos of similar parts at the wrecksite of L7845 on Muckle Cairn.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW (back to the wreckage of Wellington N2883): The end of a couple of struts attached to an alloy mounting block.

 

The end of a couple of struts attached to an alloy mounting block.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW (next two photos): There is a collection of fragments gathered around a large boulder.

 

(next two photos): There is a collection of fragments gathered around a large boulder.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW (next two photos): The area where the fragments are scattered. As can be seen from these photos nothing is visible from more than 0.6m (2 feet) away.

 

(next two photos): The area where the fragments are scattered.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The yellow line indicates the area where fragmented wreckage can be found.

 

(next two photos): The area where the fragments are scattered.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW (next two photos): Some wreckage parts can be seen in these photos.

 

(next two photos): Some wreckage parts can be seen in these photos.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Although only about 25cm (10 inches) long this peice was incredibly heavy.

 

Although only about 10 inches long this peice was incredibly heavy.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Locking lever attached to the piece of wingspar.

 

The shaft where this lever is attached can be compared with the two photos further up this page showing the wing spar wreckage from Wellington L7845 on Muckle Cairn.

 

Locking lever attached to the piece of wingspar.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: A cast alloy part.

 

A cast alloy part.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Some of these parts were very hard to distinguish from the rocks in the area.

 

Some of these parts were very hard to distinguish from the rocks in the area.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 

 


 

 

Return Route Photos

 

 

BELOW: By heading west to return via the path down the west of the plantation, I did not need to negotiate the deer fence as there's a gate at the far end [Gary].

 

By heading west to return via the path down the west of the plantation, I did not need to negotiate the deer fence as there's a gate at the far end [Gary].

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW (next three photos): The crash site taken from the treeline.

 

(next three photos): The crash site taken from the treeline.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

The crash site taken from the treeline.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW (next two photos): The path down the west of the plantation.

 

(next two photos): The path down the west of the plantation.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

The path down the west of the plantation.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW (next three photos): About 1.6km (1 mile) south of N2883's crash site, in the middle of the plantation, is this 1.8m (6ft) high cairn.

 

According to locals and an archaeological survey carried out before the laying of the pipeline, this cairn was constructed to commemorate a nearby WWII era plane crash.

 

(next three photos): About 1 mile south of N2883's crash site, in the middle of the plantation, is this 6ft high cairn.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW (next two photos): The cairn taken from the pipeline road.

 

(next two photos): The cairn taken from the pipeline road.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 

 

 


 

 

 

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Crash Date / Site

 

 

Aircraft page added: 23 Apr 2015

 

Page last updated: 11 May 2015
(Memorial photos added)

 


 

Accident Date: 19 Sep 1940

 

Accident Site:

Glenmoriston.

 

Region: Highland (Inverness-shire)

 

Nearest towns or villages:

Invermoriston (NE) (Loch Ness)

 

Nearest large town:

Fort Augustus (E)

 

OS Grid Refs: N/A

 

GPS Refs: N/A

 

Present Wreckage Status: Small parts and fragments scattered around the crash site.

 

 

 

Aircraft Details

 

 

Registration or Serial: N2883

 

Operator: RAF (20 Operational Training Unit (OTU); (later transferred to No. 91 Group))

 

Operating Station: RAF Lossiemouth; (RAF No. 91 Group Bomber OTU. Operating base also for No. 46 Maintenance Unit (MU), and RN HMS Fulmar.)

 

Station Location: Lossiemouth, Morayshire, 5 miles N of Elgin.

 

Current Station Status: Operational Military Airport.

 

Current Station Name: RAF Lossiemouth (EGQS)

 

 

 

Related Links

 

 

RAF and Related Links

RAF Lossiemouth at Wikipedia

RAF Museum (London and Cosford)

RAF Vickers Wellington (History)

 

Other Link

Vickers Wellington at u.boat.net

 

 

 

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