Percival Prentice G-AOLR

Corrie Hill, The Banns, Kilsyth Hills

 
     
 
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Aircraft Type Photo

 

Note: The photo below shows an ex-military equivalent of the civil Percival Prentice featured on this page.

 

BELOW: Percival P.40 Prentice T.1 (VR259/M, G-APJB) giving a pleasure flight at Kemble Airport, Gloucestershire, England.

 

The aircraft is owned by the Air Atlantique Classic Flight, Coventry, England. The girl seen is having a treat for her fifth birthday at the Kemble Open Day on 9th September 2007. The aircraft was built in 1948.

 

 

Photographed 2007 by Adrian Pingstone (Arpingstone) and placed in the public domain.

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Type and Background

 

Percival P.40 Prentice 1 /  G-AOLR

 


 

The Percival P-40 Prentice was a post-war single engined basic trainer used by the RAF and some other air forces. The Prentice was assigned to Flying Training Schools (FTS), and replaced de Havilland Tiger Moths as a basic trainer. The Prentice continued in service with the RAF until 1953 when they were replaced by Percival Proctors.

 

The Prentice was equipped with a Gipsy Queen engine—different variants of the Gipsy Queen being used in different models of the Prentice.

 

When the RAF disposed of their Prentice trainers they were made available on the civil market. The aircraft featured on this page was likely an ex-RAF trainer, although it had been pre-owned by another civil operator before being sold to the company operating it at the time of the crash.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Accident Details

 

On 30 July 1961, Percival Prentice G-AOLR was carrying spares on a flight from Biggin Hill airfield in Kent to the former Renfrew aerodrome near Glasgow. The pilot managed to reach the Falkirk area, north of Glasgow. However, as the weather was very poor and low cloud extended over a wide area, the pilot sought guidance from Air Traffic Control. The Controller instructed the pilot to remain in the vicinty of Falkirk railway station (which the pilot could see) while continuing to maintain visual contact with the ground.

 

Shortly, after this, the pilot reported that he was flying in cloud at 300m (c. 1,000ft). ATC instructed him to climb immediately to 600m (c.2,000ft). No further contact was heard from the pilot of the aircraft.

 

The Prentice had been flying too low over the hills north of Glasgow. As a result, it had crashed on the slopes of Corrie Hill, close to The Banns on the Kilsyth Hills.

 

A local farmer—Mr Henry Muirhead of Cairnbog—believed he saw something grey on the hill when tending his cattle at 06.00 hours. The farmer woke his two nephews John Duncan (16) and Andrew Duncan (14). The two boys climbed up to the spot on the hillside to discover the wreckage of a still-burning light aircraft. On looking around the crash site, John and Andrew discovered the badly burned bodies of the two occupants. They had been thrown clear of the wreckage.

 

Police later removed the bodies to Cairnbog farm, and from there to Stirling for identification.

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Pilot / Passenger Casualties

 

Both occupants (pilot and passenger) died in this accident. These were:

 

  • Mr Christopher Howard Bonson

  •  

  • Mr Neil Macdonald Cameron

 

 

 

 

 

Crash Site Photos

 

BELOW: The path leading up to the hill on the left.

 

The wreck is on the hill just above the right hand side of the row of trees enclosed within the yellow ellipsis, and is marked with a red arrow on the next photo.

 

The path leading up to the hill on the right.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Arrow indicates location of crash site.

 

Arrow indicates location of crash site.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Some of the first pieces of wreckage found on arrival at the crash site on Corrie Hill (red arrow).

 

One of the first pieces of wreckage found on arrival at the crash site on Corrie Hill.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: A closer view of wreckage from Percival Prentice G-AOLR.

 

A closer view of wreckage from Percival Prentice G-AOLR.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Another part of the airframe.

 

Another part of the airframe.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The largest remaining part of the aircraft—a section of wing spar.

 

a section of wing spar.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: End view of fractured wing spar.

 

End view of fractured wing spar.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Edge view of wing spar showing connecting plates.

 

Edge view of wing spar showing connecting plates.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Coupling / reinforcing plates along the edge of the wing spar.

 

Coupling / reinforcing plates along the edge of the wing spar.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Another view of this section of wing spar.

 

Another view of this section of wing spar.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The wing spar viewed from the opposite end.

 

The wing spar viewed from the opposite end.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Overview of wing spar from the opposite end.

 

Overview of wing spar from the opposite end.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: View from the opposite side.

 

View from the opposite side.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 

 

 

MORE PHOTOS BELOW

 

 

 


 

 

 

 


 

 

BELOW: Some smaller sections of wreckage lying on the hillside.

 

Some smaller sections of wreckage lying on the hillside.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: One of the smaller sections.

 

One of the smaller sections.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: This section shows manufacturer's codes.

 

This section shows manufacturer's codes.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: A crumpled piece of aluminium skinning.

 

A crumpled piece of aluminium skinning.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Part of an undercarriage leg?

 

Part of an undercarriage leg?

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Another section of wreckage with manufacturer's codes.

 

Another section of wreckage with manufacturer's codes.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Unidentified hinged part.

 

Unidentified hinged part.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The wreckage shown in relation to the hilltop.

 

The wreckage shown in relation to the hilltop.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Another view of the remaining wreckage.

 

Another view of the remaining wreckage.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: A more distant view showing the surroundings. The wreckage can be seen on the slope on the right of the photo (red arrows).

 

A more distant view showing the surroundings.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Looking back toward the crash site—now, in the distance.

 

Looking back toward the crash site; now, in the distance.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The wreckage is dead centre of the photo just to the left of the small scar on the hillside.

 

The wreckage is dead centre of the photo just to the left of the small scar on the hillside.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 

 

 


 

 

 

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Crash Date / Site

 

 

Aircraft page added: 15 Apr 2015

 

Page last updated: 15 Apr 2015

 



 

Accident Date: 30 Jul 1961

 

Accident Site:

Corrie Hill, The Banns

(Kilsyth Hills)

 

Region: North Lanarkshire

 

Nearest towns or villages:

Queenzieburn (S) or Kilsyth (SE)

 

Nearest larger towns or city:

Kilsyth (SE), Kirkintilloch (S) or Glasgow (SW)

 

OS Grid Ref.

 

GPS Ref. NS 68203 79289 and NS 68176 79323.

 

Present Wreckage Status:

Large piece of wing spar and fragmented wreckage still at the crash site. (At 2014).

 

 

 

Aircraft Details

 

 

Registration or Serial: G-AOLR

 

Operator: Finance & General Hire Company Ltd.

 

Departure Airport: Biggin Hill.

 

Airport Location: Kent, England.

 

Current Airport Status: Operational General Aviation / Business Airport.

(Private and business jets, turbo-props, and helicopters. No fare-paying commercial flights operate from Biggin Hill.)

 

Current Airport Name: London Biggin Hill Airport.

 

 

Destination Airport: Renfrew Aerodrome.

 

Airport Location: Renfrew near Glasgow, Scotland.

 

Current Airport Status: Closed and overbuilt with motorway and housing.

 

Nearest Operational Airport: BAA Glasgow International Airport (EGPF)

 

Operational Airport Location: Abbotsinch, Glasgow.
(Former RAF Abbotsinch / RN HMS Sanderling.)

 

 

 

 

Related Links

 

Accident Specific Link

Glasgow Herald newspaper article.

 

 

Percival Prentice

Percival Prentice at Wikipedia

 

Percival Prentice at Classic Air Force

 

Percival Prentice over Warwickshire (YouTube video)

 

 

 

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