Airspeed Oxford DF448

Shank of Donald Young, Grampians

 
     
 
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Aircraft Type Photo

 

BELOW: An Airspeed Oxford Advanced Trainer

 

Airspeed Oxford Advanced Trainer.

 

Photo published in Aircraft of the Fighting Powers Vol I Ed: H J Cooper, O G Thetford and D A. Russell Harborough Publishing Co, Leicester, England 1940. Copyright lapsed.

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Type and Background

 

RAF Airspeed AS.10 Oxford Mk.I / DF448

 


 

Aircraft Type Nickname: "The Ox-Box"

 

 

The Airspeed Oxford was developed from the Airspeed AS.6 Envoy commercial aircraft as an RAF trainer. The Oxford was equipped with two 355hp - 375hp seven cylinder air-cooled Armstrong-Siddeley Cheetah IX or X radial engines.

 

Essentially, this was a 3-seater aircraft, but provision was made for up to 6 crew. The Oxford was equipped with dual controls for pilot training purposes, but these could be removed for bombardier training.

 

Several other crew training roles were also covered by the Airspeed Oxford, preparing aircrew for entry into RAF Bomber Command.

 

At least 8 variants of the Airspeed Oxford were produced. In addition to those manufactured by Airspeed Ltd., some of these aircraft were built by sub-contractors such as de-Havilland, Percival, and Standard Motors. The Mark I Oxford was equipped with an Armstrong-Whitworth dorsal turret, but all subsequent variants lacked this feature.

 

In addition to their role as advanced trainers, Oxfords were used as communications, anti-aircraft, and anti-submarine aircraft; and also as air ambulances.

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Accident Details

 

On 26th October 1944, Airspeed Oxford DF448 of No. 2 Flying Instructor School (2 FIS) took off from RAF Montrose on a training flight.

 

On the return flight to the airfield, the Oxford was making a controlled descent through cloud toward the runway. However, while passing through cloud, the aircraft struck the hills above Glen Lethnot, finally crashing at Shank of Donald Young.

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Pilot Survivors (One Pilot under training)

 

Both airman survived this incident (with injuries). They were:

    Flt Sgt J. P. Waters, Pilot.

     

    Sgt W. Shuttleworth, Pilot.

 

 

 

 

 

Crash Site Photos

 

BELOW: There is quite a bit of wiring and hydraulic pipes lying in the burn crater.

 

There is quite a bit of wiring a hydraulic pipes lying in the burn crater.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: View south with Ruragh in the distance.

 

View south with Ruragh in the distance.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Heavily corroded bracket.

 

Heavily corroded bracket.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: One of several collections of wreckage.

 

One of several collections of wreckage.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Another heavily corroded part.

 

Another heavily corroded part.

 

Photo © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 

 

More photos from Gary Nelson's 2014 collection on:

 

PAGE 1-B (Route Photos),
PAGE 1-C (Wreckage Photos, Part 1)
PAGE 1-D (Wreckage Photos, Part 2.)

 

 

 

 

 

 OTHER PHOTOS BELOW

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

BELOW: The main debris field from Airspeed Oxford DF448

 

main debris field.

 

Photo © 2014 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: A detached component from the airframe.

 

a detached component.

 

Photo © 2014 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Another section of wreckage found at the crash site.

 

another section of wreckage.

 

Photo © 2014 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: The number '448' has been stencilled onto this part of the airframe. The Oxford's serial number was DF448.

 

number 448 on airframe.

 

Photo © 2014 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Part of the hydraulic undercarriage legs (oleo legs) from the aircraft.

 

undercarriage legs.

 

Photo © 2014 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: A highly corroded battery.

 

highly corroded battery.

 

Photo © 2014 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Another detached section from the main wreckage.

 

another detached section of wreckage.

 

Photo © 2014 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Sections of the undercarriage retraction gear assembly.

 

retraction gear assemblies.

 

Photo © 2014 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Unidentified component.

 

unidentified component.

 

Photo © 2014 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Wing section and spar.

 

wing section and spar.

 

Photo © 2014 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Another unidentified component.

 

another unidentified component.

 

Photo © 2014 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Spars from the airframe.

 

spars from the airframe.

 

Photo © 2014 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: The main debris field showing wing sections and parts of undercarriage, etc. from Airspeed Oxford DF448

 

main debris field from oxford df448.

 

Photo © 2014 Jerry Drury

 


 

BELOW: Another view of the debris field from the Oxford crash on Shank of Donald Young.

 

another view of debris field from oxford df448.

 

Photo © 2014 Jerry Drury

 


 

BELOW: Part of the undercarriage assembly and some other wreckage.

 

part of undercarriage.

 

Photo: © 2014 Jerry Drury

 


 

BELOW: One pair of main hydraulic undercarriage legs (oleo struts).

 

main undercarriage legs.

 

Photo: © 2014 Jerry Drury

 


 

BELOW: The other main undercarriage legs, still attached to the retraction unit. Also visible are wing sections and wing spars.

 

The yellow paint on the wings, etc., indicates that this was a training aircraft. This colour was not only highly visible in the air but also on the ground, when viewed against naturally-coloured terrain or snow-covered terrain. This made it easier to locate aircraft that had crashed or force landed.

 

the other main undercarriage legs.

 

Photo: © 2014 Jerry Drury

 

 

 

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Crash Date / Site

 

 

Pages last updated: 8 May 2015

 


 

Accident Date: 26 Oct 1944

 

Accident Site:

Shank of Donald Young

(Glen Lethnot (West))

 

Nearest Road (from Brechin): A90; then by unclassified roads and tracks to Glen Lethnot and Burn of Duskintry.

 

Region: Angus (Grampian Mountains)

 

Nearest town or village:

Little Brechin

 

Nearest large town or city:

Brechin (S)

 

OS Grid Ref. N/A

 

GPS Ref: N/A

 

Present Wreckage Status: Some wreckage remains at the site, including wing sections, undercarriage legs and other smaller pieces.

 


 

Other air crash sites in this vicinity:

 

1) RAF Airspeed Oxford PH311 at Cairn Trench.

 

2) RAF Vickers Wellington L7845 at Muckle Cairn (Tom Titlach).

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Details

 

 

Registration or Serial: DF448

 

Operator: RAF (2 Flying Instructor School (2 FIS); Later, No. 2 FIS at British Commonwealth Air Training Plan Schools - Canada)

 

(To prevent the Luftwaffe targeting vulnerable training aircraft and their pilots, FIS units were moved to Canada, South Africa, and Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe))

 

Operating Station: RAF Montrose

 

Station Location: Montrose, Angus, Scotland.

 

Current Station Status: Military Airport closed . Now, an RAF Heritage Centre.

 

Current Station Name: Montrose Air Station Heritage Centre

 

 

 

 

 

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