Gloster Meteor T.7 WL336

Rynechkra, Càm Sgriob, Highland

 
     
 
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Aircraft Type Photo

 

BELOW: A dual cockpit Gloster Meteor T.7 of 613 (City of Manchester) Squadron RAF at RAF Ta Kali (Ta Qali), Malta, in 1952.

 

The T.7 training variant was the type that crashed at Càm Sgriob.

 

gloster meteor t.7 training aircraft

 

Photo: 1952 RuthAS

 

This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

 


 

Other variants of the Gloster Meteor

 

BELOW: Gloster Meteor NF.11 (i.e., Night Fighter 11) WM167 (now, privately owned) at the Classic Jet Air Show (now, Cotswold Air Show), Kemble, Gloucestershire, in June 2005. [Wikimedia]

 

See recent photo here, at Flickr.

 

Meteor NF11

 

Photo: 2005 Adrian Pingstone (Arpingstone). Released by the author to the public domain.

 


 

BELOW: Privately-owned ex-RAF Hawker Hunter T7A (RAF code WV318, civil registration G-FFOX) flies with privately-owned ex-RAF Gloster Meteor NF.11 (RAF code WM167, civil registration G-LOSM) at Kemble Air Show (now, Cotswold Air Show), Kemble Airport, Gloucestershire, England. [Wikipedia]

 

Hawker Hunter and Gloster Meteor flying in formation

 

Photo: 2009 Adrian Pingstone (Arpingstone). Released by the author to the public domain.

 


 

BELOW: Gloster Meteor NF.11 WM245 of 151 Squadron RAF Leuchars.

 

Gloster Meteor NF 11

 

 (Photo taken at Blackbushe Airport, Hants, in 1955).

Photo: RuthAS

 

This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Type and Background

 

RN Gloster Meteor T.7 (F-IV) / WL336

 


 

The Gloster Meteor was developed during WWII and was the first jet fighter in service with the RAF before the end of the war.

 

The Meteor entered operational service in 27 July 1944—just behind the German Messerschmitt Me262. The Messerschmitt Me262—also a jet-powered aircraft—had been under development for some time before the Meteor. It entered operational service on 26 July 1944—one day before the Meteor.

Initially, the Meteor was powered by two W2B turbo-jet engines designed by Frank Whittle. However, this type proved unsatisfactory, and the Whittle design was later passed to Rolls-Royce who produced a modified version with greater thrust. This was the W2B/23 Welland enginethe type later fitted to the production model Meteor Mk I. Some models, however, were equipped with Rolls-Royce Derwent engines.

The first RAF squadron to receive the Meteor fighter (in 1944) was 616 Squadron. This squadron engaged their new Meteors against the V-1 flying bombs. After some initial difficulties with their guns, this Meteor squadron managed to shoot down a fair proportion of V-1s.


The Gloster Meteor T.7 (F-IV airframe) featured on this page was a two seat advanced fighter trainer (pilot and pupil). The T.7 variant was used by both the RAF and the RN (FAA).

Being a training aircraft, the Meteor T.7 had dual controls and was unarmed. It had an extended fuselage (0.76m / 2ft 6in longer) to accommodate the second cockpit.

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Accident Details

 

RN Gloster Meteor WL336 took off from RNAS Anthorn (HMS Nuthatch) in Cumbria for an exercise which involved flying over the Scottish Highlands.

 

 Unfortunately, while flying over the hills above Grantown on Spey, the aircraft struck Rynechkra near Càm Sgriob.

 

There are few details concerning the cause of the crash. However, it is believed that the pilot just failed to clear the hill summit during the exercise. At the time, there was low cloud and mist in the area.

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Pilot Casualty

 

The pilot who died in this incident was:

  • Sub/Lt. A T B Gould, RN.

 

[Many thanks to Alan Leishman for kindly providing pilot and air base details.]

 

 

Although used principally as a training aircraft, no pupil was on board this Meteor at the time of the accident.

 

 

 

 

 

Crash Site Photos

 

BELOW: Crushed jet engine exhaust shroud from the Gloster Meteor.

 

Crushed jet engine exhaust shroud.

 

Photo © 2015 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: End view of engine exhaust shroud.

 

End view of engine exhaust shroud.

 

Photo © 2015 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Side view of exhaust shroud.

 

Side view of exhaust shroud.

 

Photo © 2015 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Close-up view of code etched on side.

 

Close-up view of code etched on side.

 

Photo © 2015 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Other markings can be seen etched on this piece of aluminium.

 

Other markings can be seen etched on this piece of aluminium.

 

Photo © 2015 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW (next 4 photos) : Remaining sections of one of the two turbo-jet engines.

 

(next 4 photos) : Remaining sections of one of the two turbo-jet engines.

 

Photo © 2015 Neil Daniel

 


 

 

 

Photo © 2015 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Close-up of the fan section.

 

Close-up of the fan section.

 

Photo © 2015 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW: Another close-up of the engine part.

 

Another close-up of the engine part.

 

Photo © 2015 Neil Daniel

 


 

BELOW (next 4 photos) : Remains of the other turbo-jet exhaust shroud.

 

(next 4 photos) : Remains of the other turbo-jet exhaust shroud.

 

Photo © 2015 Neil Daniel

 


 

 

 

Photo © 2015 Neil Daniel

 


 

 

 

Photo © 2015 Neil Daniel

 


 

 

 

Photo © 2015 Neil Daniel

 

 

 

MORE PHOTOS BELOW

 

 


 

 

 

 


 

 

Earlier Photos

 

 

BELOW: General view of site looking to E Rynechkra. (Following wreckage photos at NH 978 303 approx.)

 

Some wreckage parts can be seen in the foreground / midground.

 

General view of site looking to E Rynechkra.

 

Photo © 2014 Richard Doake

 


 

BELOW: First of the remaining wreckage parts at this location.

 

first of remaining wreckage parts at this location.

 

Photo © 2014 Richard Doake

 


 

BELOW: Second of the remaining wreckage parts.

 

Part of an exhaust shroud from one of the Rolls Royce Derwent turbo-jet engines. Click here to see how this engine and shroud should look (external website).

 

 

second of remaining wreckage parts.

 

Photo © 2014 Richard Doake

 


 

BELOW: Another view of the turbo-jet exhaust shroud.

 

another view of the second part.

 

Photo © 2014 Richard Doake

 


 

BELOW: Side view of exhaust shroud.

 

side view of above part.

 

Photo © 2014 Richard Doake

 

 

 


 

 

 

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Crash Date / Site

 

 

Page last updated: 11 July 2015

(More wreckage photos added.)

 


 

Accident Date: 20 Oct 1955

 

Accident Site:

Rynechkra near Càm Sgriob.

(Hill and farm ruin photo)

 

Closest main roads:

A938, A939 or B9007.

Then, by unclassified roads and / or dirt tracks leading to moorland.

 

Region: Highland

 

Nearest towns or villages:

Grantown on Spey (SE) [Streetmap]

 

 

Nearest large towns or cities:

Inverness (NW) or Aberdeen (E)

 

OS Grid Ref: NH 975 301
and NH 978 303 (The photos shown below were taken at this latter location.)

 

GPS Refs: N/A

 

Present Condition: Substantial wreckage remained some years ago. Later, some small wreckage pieces could be found at the cairn; and also some larger sections below the summit—near the croft ruin. (See photos below).

 

 

 

Aircraft Details

 

 

Registration or Serial: WL336.

 

Operator: RN (FAA).

 

Operating Station: HMS Nuthatch (RNAS Anthorn)

 

Station Location: Anthorn, Cumbria, England.

 

Current Station Status: Military

flying operations ceased. Site now used for NATO communication masts and aerials. Former MoD housing at the site converted for civilian use and known as the village of Anthorn.

 

Note: The MSF Radio Time Signal (National Physical Laboratory) is transmitted from Anthorn Radio Station.

 

 

 

 

 

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