Avro Lancaster KB745

Goldscleugh, The Cheviot, England

 
     
 
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Aircraft Type Photo

 

BELOW: An Avro Lancaster Mk.1 bomber.

 

avro lancaster mark 1 bomber - black and white photo

 

Photo: [pre-1957] UK Government. Formerly, Crown Copyright. Now, public domain.

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Type and Background

 

RCAF Avro 683 Lancaster Mk X / KB745

 

(Click here for RAF history of this type)

 


 

Aircraft Type Nicknames: "Lanc"; "Lankie"

 

The Avro Lancaster was designed initially as a heavy bomber (more details at lancaster-archive.com). It was developed from the Avro Manchester bomber, but the unreliable Rolls-Royce Vulture engines of the Manchester were replaced on the Lancaster with 4 Rolls-Royce Merlin engines.

 

 The Lancaster Mark III variant  was fitted with 4 American-built Packard Merlin engines. The Mark X variant featured here was built by Victory Aircraft Ltd of  Ontario, Canada and was equipped with Merlin 38 engines.

 

During WWII, Lancaster bombers of 617 Squadron RAF were used to carry out the 'Dambusters Raids' (Operation Chastise) over the Mohne, Sorpe, and Eder dams using Barnes Wallis' bouncing bombs.

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Accident Details

 

Lancaster KB745 of 419 (Canadian) Squadron flew with a number of other aircraft to bomb some of the u-boat pens in Bergen, Norway. [See also here]

 

However, on its return flight, the aircraft became detached from the remainder of the squadron and ended up flying further north than the intended route.

 

Unfortunately, this course took the Lancaster over the high ground around Northumbria. Very soon afterward, the aircraft crashed close to The Cheviot, just above Goldscleugh.

 

The wreckage was discovered later by a teenage boy who was watching over the sheep on the hills in the absence of the regular shepherds.

  

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Crew Casualties

 

All 7 crew members perished in this accident. These were:

 

(Please click on the hyperlinked names above for further details at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website.)

 

 

 

 

 

Crash Site Photos

 

 

Approach Route Photos

 

 

BELOW: The path to The Cheviot is 4.8km (3 miles) from here to the summit.

 

Path to The Cheviot is 3 miles from here to the summit.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Looking back to the car park in the Harthope Valley.

 

Looking back to the car park in the Harthope Valley.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Hedgehope Hill with the edge of Threestoneburn wood and the crash site of Beaufighter EL457.

 

Hedgehope Hill with the edge of Threestoneburn wood and the crash site of Beaufighter EL457.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Hedghope Hill across the Harthope Valley.

 

The Farm at Langleeford can be seen in the trees to the left. This is where Basil Oliver lived, who was the 15-year-old who found the Lancaster.

 

Hedghope Hill across the Harthope Valley.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Approaching Scald Hill, Cheviot summit is visible on the left.

 

Approaching Scald Hill, Cheviot summit is visible on the left.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW (next two photos): Cheviot Summit from Scald Hill. The path from here and up the summit is very eroded and boggy.

 

(next two photos): Cheviot Summit from Scald Hill. The path from here and up the summit is very eroded and boggy.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: I wonder how many people have mistaken the ruined refuge hut indicated below the wrecksite (centre yellow label) for aircraft wreckage?

 

The fence in the foreground runs down the hill to the left and is possibly the one mentioned in Chris Davies' book 'Almost Forgotten' that the Armaments Officer and Waaf followed to get to the Stirling (which crashed on the summit 10 days earlier) to check it for live ordnance, they came across the Lancaster instead. [Gary]

 

Note: The top yellow label indicates the Lancaster wreckage; the centre yellow label indicates the wrecked refuge hut, and the bottom yellow label indicates the abandoned tractor wreckage.

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The area where the Lancaster crashed.

 

The area where the Lancaster crashed.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 

 


 

 

Wreckage Fragments

 

 

BELOW: Tiny scraps lying in a scar.

 

Tiny scraps lying in a scar.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW (next two photos): The tiny scraps in the previous photo can just be seen in the centre of the scar.

 

(next two photos): The tiny scraps in the previous photo can just be seen in the centre of the scar.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

 

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Other than the tiny scraps, this piece was the only part to be found without the use of a metal detector.

 

Other than the tiny scraps, this piece was the only part to be found without the use of a metal detector.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: It appeared that this piece had been incorporated into a very small cairn but had fallen out and become hidden beneath the grass.

 

It appeared that this piece had been incorporated into a very small cairn but had fallen out and become hidden beneath the grass.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: A tiny piece of Perspex with part of a fixing hole visible.

 

A tiny piece of perspex with part of a fixing hole visible.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The area where the pieces were found.

 

The area where the pieces were found.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: This piece was replaced where I found it, although on top of the grass.

 

This piece was replaced where I found it, although on top of the grass.

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The wrecked refuge hut (centre of photo).

 

From a distance this could be mistaken for a large collection of aircraft wreckage by anyone looking for the Lancaster. Luckily for me this hut was intact when I first visited this area in 1981, so I knew what it was. [Gary Nelson]

 

The wrecked refuge hut (centre of photo).

 

Photo: © 2014-2015 Gary Nelson

 

 

 

MORE PHOTOS BELOW

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Abandoned Tractor Wreckage

 

 

NOTE 1: Most of the wreckage shown below is that of an abandoned tractor.

 

 

Early Photos (1962)

 

 

BELOW: The ski tow tractor belonging to the Northumbrian Ski Club. This photo and others below are believed to have been taken in 1962.

 

ski tow tractor

 

Photo: Courtesy, Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: In 1962, during the first attempt to use it on the hill for ski towing purposes, the tractor threw a piston. It was subsequently abandoned at this location.

 

last view of tractor in working order

 

Photo: Courtesy, Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: After pushing their 'deceased' tractor down the hill and into this gully, the Northumbrian Ski Club proceeded to bury the remains of their vehicle.

 

attempted recovery of aircraft parts

 

Photo: Courtesy, Gary Nelson

 

 


 

 

Later Photos (c. 2008)

 

BELOW:  Just over forty years later, this was all that remained of the abandoned Fordson tractor. (See other images below).

 

wreckage of abandoned fordson tractor

 

Photo: © 2008-2012 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: More wreckage, including one of the wheels.

 

another view of the tractor

 

Photo: © 2008-2012 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW:  Tractor wheel and engine section.

 

tractor wheel and engine section

 

Photo: © 2008-2012 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW:  Tractor radiator.

 

tractor radiator

 

Photo: © 2008-2012 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Gary Nelson beside the tractor wreckage.

 

gary nelson beside the tractor wreckage

 

Photo: © 2008-2012 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW:  One of the main wheels.

 

one of the main tractor wheels

 

Photo: © 2008-2012 Gary Nelson

 

 

 


 

 

NOTE 2: As far as the Lancaster wreckage is concerned, the bulk of the aircraft is believed to have been buried onsite leaving only a few small pieces on the surface.

 

 


 

 

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Crash Date / Site

 

 

Page last updated: 16 Apr 2015

 



 

Country: England

 

national flag of England

 


 

Accident Date:  4 Oct 1944

 

Accident Site:

The Cheviot (above Goldscleugh)

 

(366m / 1,200ft)

 

Region: Northumberland

(National Park)

 

Nearest towns or villages:

Kirk Yetholm (Borders) (NW) or Wooler (Northumberland) (NE).

 

Nearest large towns:

None in this general area.

 

OS Grid Ref. N/A

 

GPS Ref: N/A

 

Present Wreckage Status: Believed to have been buried onsite. Only a few small parts and scattered fragments remain on the surface.

 


 

Air crashes on or near The Cheviot:

 

RAF Vickers Warwick HG136 crash at West Hill, near Cairn Hill, The Cheviot, in 1946.

 

Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress 44-6504 crash at West Hill, The Cheviot, near Braydon Crag, in 1944 (The aircraft on this page).

 

RAF Vickers Wellington Mk.IA IC Z1078 crash at West Hill, The Cheviot, in 1942.

 

RAF Short Stirling Mk. III EE972 crash near Broaden, The Cheviot in 1944.

 

RCAF Avro Lancaster Mk. X  KB745 crash above Goldscleugh, The Cheviot, in 1944. (The aircraft on this page.)

 

RAF Hawker Hart K6482 crash above Goldscleugh, The Cheviot, in 1939.

 

RAF Supermarine Spitfire P8587 crash at Bellyside Hill, The Cheviot, in 1943.

 

RAF Handley Page Hampden L4063 crash at Windy Gyle, The Cheviots, in 1940.

 

 

 

Aircraft Details

 

Registration or Serial: KB745 (Code VR-V)

 

Operator: RCAF (419 Squadron RCAF)

 

Operating Station: RAF Middleton St George

 

Station Location: 5 miles from Darlington, Co. Durham, England.

 

Current Airport Status: Operational Civil Airport

 

Current Airport Name:

Durham Tees Valley Airport (formerly, Teesside International Airport.)

 

 

 

Related Links

 

 

Lancaster Archive and Forum

Lancaster and Manchester Bomber Archive. (Extensive historical database of Lancaster and Manchester bomber aircraft and air crew.)

Lancaster Archive Forum. (Includes Lancastrian and Manchester aircraft.)

Lancaster Pages. (General information, operational data, squadrons and units, air crew details, etc.)

 

RAF / RCAF and Related Links

419 Squadron RCAF

RAF Avro Lancaster (History)

RAF Bomber Command - Middleton St George

 

Other Links

Avro Lancaster at Warbird Alley

Avro Lancaster at Wikipedia

 

 

Hill Walking Links

 

 

(Hillwalking and Mountaineering)

WalkingScotland (The official Walking site of Scotland's national tourism organisation)

Walking Scotland's Mountains

 


 

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