Hawker Hart K6482

Goldscleugh, The Cheviot, England

 
     
 
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Aircraft Type Photo

 

BELOW: Camm Hart 500. This is almost certainly a photo of G-ABMR dressed as the first production Hart J9953, as she was between 1959 and 1970.

 

 

Photo: British government employee. (Copyright expired).

 

HMSO has declared that the expiry of Crown Copyrights applies worldwide (ref: HMSO Email Reply) More information.

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Type and Background

 

RAF Hawker Hart  /  K6482

 


 

 

Aircraft Type Designation: Two-seat light day bomber.

 

 

The Hawker Hart was developed as a light day bomber for the RAF. It proved to be one of the most adaptable bi-planes in RAF service. (The Hawker Hind bi-plane developed later was based on the Hawker Hart.)

 

The Hart was fitted with a 525hp Rolls Royce Kestrel IB engine, which could achieve a maximum speed of about 295km/h (184mph).

 

The aircraft could carry a bomb load of 227kg (500lb), and it was equipped with one forward-firing (synchronised) Vickers and one rear-mounted Lewis machine guns.

 

The prototype Hawker Hart first flew in 1928. Production models were issued to No. 33 Squadron at Eastchurch in 1930.

 

Among other duties, Hawker Harts were used in conflicts in India, Abbysinia (Ethiopia), the Middle East and elsewhere. Some variants were used as communication aircraft.

 

Later (Special) versions of the Hart were equipped with a Kestrel X derated engine.

 

In 1936, the Hart was superseded by the Hawker Hind; although, in India, the Hart continued to serve until 1939.

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Accident Details

 

Summary: Ferrying from RAF Turnhouse to RAF Acklington. Flew too far west in low cloud and hit northern slopes of Cheviot.

 

 

Hawker Hart Trainer K6482 was on a ferry flight from RAF Turnhouse (Edinburgh) in Scotland, to RAF Acklington, Northumberland. It was a day of low cloud and rain and the pilot, Sgt T Mycroft, had elected to fly on a compass course.

 

The plane did not have sufficient altitude to clear the high ground south of Goldscleugh, to the west of Woolhope Crag. In the ensuing crash, Sgt Mycroft was killed. A small cairn marks where he died and considerable wreckage lies close by.

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Pilot Casualty

 

The pilot who died in this accident was:

 

  • Sgt Thomas Mycroft (24), Pilot, RAF.
    (Buried, Section B.B., Grave 96, Chevington Cemetery, Northumberland.)

 

 

Please click on the hyperlinked name above for further details at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's website.

 

 

 

 

 

Crash Site Photos (Page 1-A)

 

 

NOTE: The wreckage shown in most of these photos was dumped in the gully by the recovery crew.

 

The aircraft actually crashed slightly further up the hill. There is a small cairn and small burnt pieces scattered at the impact point further uphill.

 

 


 

 

BELOW: The gully where the wreckage was dumped.

 

(Some of these photos were taken while foggy conditions prevailed. Others, however, were taken during sunny intervals.)

 

the gully where the wreckage was dumped 1.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Another view of the wreckage lying in the gully.

 

another view of the wreckage lying in the gully.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The largest piece of alloy about 1m (3ft) long.

 

the largest piece of alloy about 1m (3ft) long.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The remains of the wooden propellor still attached to a reduction gear.

 

remains of the wooden propellor attached to a reduction gear.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Top of an hydraulic shock absorber or damper.

 

top of an hydraulic shock absorber or damper.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: There were quite a few fittings in this condition scattered among the wreckage. This was just one example.

 

there were quite a few fittings in this condition  scattered among the wreckage.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The tailwheel assembly.

 

the tailwheel assembly.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The tailwheel fork.

 

the tailwheel fork.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: A connecting plate for several steel tubes. A brace or some form of control rod can also be seen to the right of the thick tube.

 

connecting plate for several steel tubes.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Part numbers on one of the plates.

 

part numbers on one of the plates.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 

 

 

 

MORE PHOTOS BELOW

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

BELOW: Unidentified assembly.

 

unidentified assembly.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Another unidentified part.

 

another unidentified part.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: This is the part that control wires would attach to to operate the aelerons, rudder or elevators.

 

This is the part that control wires would attach to to operate the aelerons, rudder or elevators.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Reduction gear attached to remains of propellor. Tapered roller bearings can be seen.

 

reduction gear attached to remains of propellor.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Remains of the wooden propellor showing the laminated construction.

 

remains of the laminated wooden propellor.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: The other side of the propellor showing how it was bolted in place.

 

the other side of the propellor showing how it was bolted in place.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Hydraulic part encased in a streamlined fairing.

 

Hydraulic part encased in a streamlined fairing.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Plate with part numbers attached to one of the steel tubes.

 

plate with part numbers attached to one of the steel tubes.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: A very corroded joint. Behind the joint is a cog with the remains of a chain still attached.

 

a very corroded joint.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Possibly, a thermostat. The dome on the right contains a large spring.

 

possibly, a thermostat.

 

Photo: © 2014 Gary Nelson

 

 

 

 

FORWARD TO PAGE 1-B

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

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Crash Date / Site

 

Country: England

 

national flag of England

 


 

 

Accident Date:10 Oct 1939

 

Accident Site:

The Cheviot (Goldscleugh)

 

(366m / 1,200ft)

 

Region: Northumberland

(National Park)

 

Nearest towns or villages:

Kirk Yetholm (Borders) (NW) or Wooler (Northumberland) (NE).

 

Nearest large towns:

None in this general area.

 

OS Grid Ref. N/A

 

GPS Ref: N/A

 

Present Condition: Significant amounts of wreckage remains at or near the crash site; although, in a highly corroded state. It should be noted, however, that the RAF Recovery Team dumped the majority of the remaining wreckage in a gully slightly further down the slopes from the impact point. The impact point itself contains only fragments of wreckage.

 

 


 

Air crashes on or near The Cheviot:

 

1) RAF Vickers Warwick HG136 crash at West Hill, near Cairn Hill, The Cheviot, in 1946.

 

2) Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress 44-6504 crash at West Hill, The Cheviot, near Braydon Crag, in 1944 (The aircraft on this page).

 

3) RAF Vickers Wellington Mk.IA IC Z1078 crash at West Hill, The Cheviot, in 1942.

 

4) RAF Short Stirling Mk. III EE972 crash near Broaden, The Cheviot in 1944.

 

5) RCAF Avro Lancaster Mk. X  KB745 crash above Goldscleugh, The Cheviot, in 1944.

 

6) RAF Hawker Hart K6482 crash above Goldscleugh, The Cheviot, in 1939.
(The aircraft on this page.)

 

7) RAF Supermarine Spitfire P8587 crash at Bellyside Hill, The Cheviot, in 1943.

 

8) RAF Handley Page Hampden L4063 crash at Windy Gyle, The Cheviot, in 1940.

 

 

 

Aircraft Details

 

 

Registration or Serial: K6819

 

Operator: RAF (152 Squadron)

 

Operating Stations: Various / Mobile (Ferry Flights)

 

Departure Station: RAF Turnhouse.

 

Departure Station Location: Turnhouse, Edinburgh.

 

Destination Station: RAF Acklington.

 

Destination Station Location: Acklington, Northumberland, England.

 

Current Station Status (Turnhouse):

Military operations ceased.

Now, operational civil airport.

 

Current Airport Name: Edinburgh Airport.

 

Current Station Status (Acklington):

Military operations ceased in 1975.

Now, site for H.M.Prisons.

 

 

 

Related Links

 

RAF and Related Links

152 Squadron

Hawker Hart history at RAF

 

Hawker Hart Links

Hawker Hart at Aeroflight

Hawker Hart at Wikipedia

 

 

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Walking Scotland's Mountains

 


 

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