H.P. Halifax LL505

Great Carrs, Cumbria, England

 
     
 
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Aircraft Type Photo

 

BELOW: An RCAF Handley Page Halifax bomber in flight. This is an earlier variant of the type featured below.

 

an RCAF Halifax bomber in flight

 

Photo: Pre 1949. Public domain.

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Type and Background

 

RCAF Handley Page Halifax Mk V / LL505 FD-S

 


 

(Click here for RAF history of this type)

 

 

The original design of this aircraft was for a twin-engine bomber using Rolls-Royce Vulture engines. However, during development, the plans were altered to produce a four-engine aircraft using the more powerful Merlin X engines.

 

The Mk I version of the Halifax was equipped with two .303 Browning machine guns in the nose turret, with another two in the centre of the fuselage and four in the rear turret. In the Mk II series, the nose turret guns and the guns in the fuselage waist area were deleted. A a Boulton Paul twin-gun turret gun was installed in the dorsal position to replace the waist guns.

 

In time, other versions and variants followed with greater improvements. The type featured on this page was a Halifax Mk. V.

 

Equipped to carry a crew of seven, the Halifax entered service with RAF Bomber Command in 1940.

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Accident Details

 

Handley Page Halifax LL505 FD-S crashed on Great Carrs while on a night navigation exercise (NAVEX) from RAF Topcliffe in Yorkshire.

 

While flying over the Lake District, the crew encountered very heavy cloud and mist. To enable the navigator to obtain a visual fix on the ground, the pilot descended through the thick cloud. This action, however, brought him below safe flying altitude for this area. Very soon afterward, the Halifax struck the ground close to the summit of Great Carrs. Sadly, all on board perished.

 

Following the crash, much of the aircraft remained intact. If left like this, the wreck could have been mistaken for a recent crash by aircraft flying overhead and reported to the authorities for immediate rescue and recovery action. To prevent this, the Halifax was cut up by RAF recovery teams and the sections pushed from Great Carrs into Broad Slack. Two wing sections and other parts can be found at this location.

 

Two of the four Rolls-Royce Merlin engines were recovered from the crash site by an RAF Chinook helicopter some time after the accident. One is now on display at the Ruskin Museum, Coniston. Another is at the RAF Museum in London. Other parts were removed from the site to Yorkshire Air Museum and to Newark Air Museum.

 

 

 

 

 

Aircraft Crew Casualties

 

Those who died in this tragic accident were:

 

(Please click on the hyperlinked names above for further details at the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's website.)

 

 

 

 

 

Crash Site Photos

 

BELOW: Memorial on the summit of Great Carrs to the crew of Halifax LL505 who died in this accident.

 

The small plaque on the cross reads:

 

Halifax Bomber

LL505 - 'S' for Sugar

R.C.A.F.

October 22, 1944

 

Memorial on Great Carrs to the crew of Halifax LL505 who died in this accident

 

Photo: © 2008 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Much of the remaining wreckage from Halifax LL505 lies among the boulders below Great Carrs. Shortly after the accident, the almost-intact aircraft was cut into sections by RAF recovery teams and pushed into the gulley below the crash site.

 

halifax wreckage lies among boulders below Great Carrs

 

Photo: © 2009 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Another view of the wreckage among the boulders.

 

Another view of the wreckage among the boulders

 

Photo: © 2009 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Two of the four Rolls-Royce Merlin engines from Halifax LL505.

 

Since this photo was taken, at least one of these engines has been recovered for museum display.

 

two of the Merlin engines from the Halifax

 

Photo: © 2009 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: A closer view of one of the four Rolls-Royce Merlin engines from the Halifax bomber.

 

one of the four Rolls-Royce Merlin engines from the Halifax

 

Photo: © 2009 Gary Nelson

 

 

 

MORE PHOTOS BELOW

 

 


 

 

 

 

 


 

BELOW: Another Merlin engine.

 

Another Merlin engine

 

Photo: © 2009 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Part of propeller / engine reduction gear.

 

Part of propeller - engine reduction gear

 

Photo: © 2009 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Underside of the rear fuselage.

 

The aperture visible is where the tailwheel assembly was attached.

 

Part of a wing section from the Halifax

 

Photo: © 2009 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: One of the four Merlin engines from the Halifax bomber.

 

This engine was recovered from the crash site and is now on display at Ruskin Museum, Coniston. Another recovered engine is at an RAF Museum.

 

One of the four Merlin engines from the Halifax. This engine is on display at Ruskin Museum, Coniston

 

Photo: © 2009 Gary Nelson

 


 

BELOW: Another view of the recovered engine at Ruskin Museum, Coniston.

 

The wife of Gary Nelson, who kindly provided these photos, stands nearby.

 

Closer view of recovered engine at Ruskin Museum

 

Photo: © 2009 Gary Nelson

 

 


 

 

Photo Gallery

 

For additional, larger, photos, please select

 HP HALIFAX-GREAT-CARRS

from the drop down Album Menu in the Photo Gallery.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Crash Date / Site

 

Country: England

 

england national flag 


 

Accident Date: 22 Oct 1944

 

Accident Site:

Great Carrs [map] (780m / 2,558ft)

(NW of Swirl How)

 

Region: Cumbria (Lakeland Fells)

 

Nearest town or village:

Little Langdale or

Coniston

 

Nearest large town:

 Ambleside (E)

 

OS Grid Ref. N/A

 

GPS Ref: N/A

 

Present Condition: Small wreckage section beside memorial cairn on Great Carrs. Larger sections at Broad Slack.

 

Recovered engine at Ruskin Museum, Coniston. Other recovered parts at The Pathfinder Museum, RAF Brampton Wyton Henlow

 

 

 

Aircraft Details

 

Registration or Serial: LL505

 

Operator: RCAF (1659 Heavy Conversion Unit (HCU))

 

Operating Base: RAF Topcliffe (Satellite Station for RAF Linton-on-Ouse)

 

Base Location: Topcliffe, North Yorkshire, England.

 

Current Base Status: RAF Station closed in 1972. Base transferred to Army. RAF returned in 1993 with Joint Elementary Flying Training School.

 

Current Base Name: Alanbrooke Barracks (Army)

 


 

Principal airport data courtesy of John Woodside, A Catalogue of UK Airfields

 

 

 

 

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